Download e-book for kindle: A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the by Kenneth M. Swope

By Kenneth M. Swope

ISBN-10: 0806140569

ISBN-13: 9780806140568

The invasion of Korea by means of eastern troops in may perhaps of 1592 was once no traditional army excursion: it used to be one of many decisive occasions in Asian heritage and the main tragic for the Korean peninsula until eventually the mid-twentieth century. eastern overlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi estimated conquering Korea, Ming China, and at last all of Asia; yet Korea’s attract China’s Emperor Wanli for tips brought on a six-year conflict concerning thousands of squaddies and encompassing the total area. For Japan, the battle used to be “a dragon’s head through a serpent’s tail”: a magnificent starting without actual ending.

Kenneth M. Swope has undertaken the 1st full-length scholarly research in English of this significant clash. Drawing on Korean, jap, and particularly chinese language resources, he corrects the Japan-centered viewpoint of prior money owed and depicts Wanli now not because the self-indulgent ruler of acquired interpretations yet really one actively engaged in army affairs—and involved specifically with rescuing China’s consumer nation of Korea. He places the Ming in a extra lively gentle, detailing chinese language siege conflict, the improvement and deployment of cutting edge army applied sciences, and the naval battles that marked the climax of the warfare. He additionally explains the war’s repercussions open air the army sphere—particularly the dynamics of intraregional international relations in the shadow of the chinese language tributary system.

What Swope calls the 1st nice East Asian conflict marked either the emergence of Japan’s wish to expand its sphere of impression to the chinese language mainland and an army revival of China’s dedication to protecting its pursuits in Northeast Asia. Swope’s account bargains new perception not just into the heritage of battle in Asia but additionally right into a clash that reverberates in diplomacy to this day.

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Download e-book for kindle: A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the by Kenneth M. Swope

The invasion of Korea by way of jap troops in could of 1592 was once no traditional army excursion: it used to be one of many decisive occasions in Asian background and the main tragic for the Korean peninsula until eventually the mid-twentieth century. jap overlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi estimated conquering Korea, Ming China, and finally all of Asia; yet Korea’s attract China’s Emperor Wanli for counsel prompted a six-year struggle related to thousands of squaddies and encompassing the full sector.

Extra resources for A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598

Sample text

Concerning the Liaodong campaign itself, among the fall guys was Yang Hao, the supreme civil commander of the expedition, who had been embroiled in controversy during his tenure as commissioner of Korean affairs in the 1590s. Accordingly, Yang’s defeat was viewed as part of a pattern of failure by the Ming military during the previous decades. Accounts of Ming victories were dismissed as overblown attempts by eunuchs and their lackeys to curry favor with corrupt and shortsighted monarchs, while defeats were magnified by righteous literati circles to effect administrative changes that advanced their own interests.

They could be very ambitious and arrogant; there is no way to satisfy their appetite. ”31 As a result of Wanli’s support, the Ming pursued a much more aggressive and reasonably successful frontier policy. During most of his reign, the empire was confronted with several military challenges simultaneously. But blessed with an unusually talented coterie of commanders, from about 1570 to 1610 the Ming military was probably at its strongest since the Yongle reign as the empire proved able not only to maintain internal security but also to project military force for political ends.

Such claims also ignore the third side of the Ming “peace triangle,” military force. Throughout the last decades of the sixteenth century and into the seventeenth century, the Ming launched what can best be described as destabilizing surgical strikes into Mongol (and Manchu) territory, burning settlements, killing threatening leaders, and capturing valuable livestock. 33 Actions like these were the brainchild of Zhang Juzheng and approved by Wanli. Zhang afforded his frontier commanders great latitude in the completion of their duties and was willing to look the other way occasionally when those jealous of their achievements brought charges.

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A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 by Kenneth M. Swope


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